Videos

Published on 14 Jul 2016

This video illustrates how carefully producing many ripples on the surface of a medium can create desired waves from constructive and destructive interference.

The red ring is an area of minimal wave motion and the green ring is an area of linear wave motion. As the number of red spherical balls (wave sources) increases the ringed areas approach their desired motion. The rigid black bars attached to the wave sources are shown to illustrate the mechanical motion of the sources.


Published on 13 Apr 2016

A short time-lapse setting up 24 Genelec 8010As for the multizone surround sound spatial audio project in the University of Wollongong’s anechoic chamber.


Published on 30 Nov 2015

A short time-lapse of the deconstruction of the geodesic dome in the University of Wollongong’s anechoic chamber.


Published on 20 Oct 2015

This animation is an example of a reproduction of multizone spatial audio using loudspeakers to create personal sound zones. The circular zone on the left shows a bright zone with a desired 2kHz planewave at an angle of 15°. The circular zone on the right shows the quiet zone which has the desired bright zone signal directed towards it. This is known as the multizone occlusion problem.

The error induced by the occlusion problem is varied as the weighting of the zones changes their relative importance in the reproduction. The weighting is minimum at the beginning and end of the animation and maximum half way through.

The large black circle is the reproduction area to be controlled. The black and white circles on the left represent 32 loudspeakers (point sources) starting at 180° and continuing to 264°. The size in space of this spatial audio system can be seen from the measurements on the axes.

The desired soundfield was synthesised using the technique described in [].
The reproduction was synthesised using the technique described in [].


Published on Jul 27, 2015

This animation is an example of a reproduction of multizone spatial audio using loudspeakers to create personal sound zones. The circular zone on the left shows a bright zone with a desired 2kHz planewave at an angle of 0°. The circular zone on the right shows the quiet zone which is moved behind the bright zone.

The occlusion problem becomes present as the desired planewave in the bright zone is directed towards the quite zone as it passes behind. The occlusion problem is at its worst when the desired planewave in the bright zone is directed completely towards the quite zone. A drop in spatial reproduction accuracy is present when the occlusion problem occurs.

The large black circle is the reproduction area to be controlled. The black and white circles on the left represent 32 loudspeakers (point sources) starting at 180° and continuing to 264°.

The size in space of this spatial audio system can be seen from the measurements on the axes.

The desired soundfield was synthesised using the technique described in [].
The reproduction was synthesised using the technique described in [].


Published on Nov 11, 2014

This animation is an example of a reproduction of multizone spatial audio using loudspeakers. The circular zone on the left shows a bright zone with a desired 2kHz planewave at an angle of +15°. The circular zone on the right shows the quiet zone. The zone weightings are set the same as those in the paper mentioned below.

The large blue circle is the reproduction area to be controlled. The black and white circles on the left represent 16 loudspeakers (point sources) starting at 150° and continuing to 234°.

The size in space of this spatial audio system can be seen from the measurements on the axes.

The desired soundfield was synthesised using the technique described in [].
The reproduction was synthesised using the technique described in [].

Note: The title “Real” is because this is the real part of the soundfield represented by complex numbers.


Published on Nov 5, 2014

This animation is an example of multizone spatial audio. The circular zone on the left shows a bright zone with a desired 2kHz planewave at an angle of +15°. The circular zone on the right shows another bright zone with a desired 1.25kHz planewave at an angle of +90°. The zone weightings are set the same as those in the paper mentioned below.

The size in space of this soundfield can be seen from the measurements on the axes.

This setup was simulated based on the technique described in [].

Note: The title “Real” is because this is the real part of the soundfield represented by complex numbers.


Published on Nov 5, 2014

This animation is an example of multizone spatial audio. The circular zone on the left shows a bright zone with a desired 2kHz planewave at an angle of +15°. The circular zone on the right shows the quiet zone. The zone weightings are set the same as those in the paper mentioned below.

The size in space of this soundfield can be seen from the measurements on the axes.

This setup was simulated using a technique described in [].

Note: The title “Real” is because this is the real part of the soundfield represented by complex numbers.


Published on 27 Apr 2014

Multizone soundfield reproduction using 39 loudspeakers (red dots) to create a bright zone (features a band-limited soundwave coming at -pi/12) and a quiet zone.


References

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